74 thoughts on “Bamboo Under Fingernails

  1. Zach on said:

    despite early praise, it looks like Cera’s usual emo schlock crossed with THE SPIRIT

  2. Ha.

    I’m not ashamed to admit to being a frothing-at-the-mouth rabid fan of the Scott Pilgrim books (I’m nerdy enough that I have a page of original art framed in the other room), and as high as my expectations were for the trailer, it looks better than I ever could’ve hoped to see.

    It always felt like Bryan Lee O’Malley was making the books for an audience of me-and-no-one-else, and I’m not really sure how a feature film version will play with the mainstream.

  3. Certainly Scott Pigrim as comic channels love’s little Emo’s into manga styling and super-fights — and there’s some charm in that — but the trailer’s emphasis on the myopic treatment of anything comic as a CGI movie riff on ’60′ Batman camp…ugh. If it’s in the film, it needs a way better trailer.

  4. If this is bamboo, Beezlebub hereby sentences you to watching an eternal loop of the trailers for Remember Me, G-Force, White Chicks, and the Jonas Brothers concert movie.

  5. I love the books, but the trailer leaves me cold.

    I think it’s Michael Cera’s usual schtick that bothers me the most. I would have hoped for an actor who can portray boundless enthusiasm which is what the character calls for.

  6. Because it’s Edgar Wright directing, I’ll take a look–even though it looks like KICK-ASS meets YOUTH IN REVOLT (which wasn’t all that bad).

    But it’s time for Cera to move on from playing mild-mannered teens roused to action.

  7. It seems like the controlling variable here, given as little as Jeff knows about the movie (having not read the source material), would be that it’s directed by Edgar Wright, who has done no wrong. Nick nails it in terms of how Cera’s casting, to judge from the trailer, was not an ideal fit, but Wright should get the benefit of Wells’ doubt.

  8. “Is the ‘Elsewhere’ in Hollywood Elsewhere now referring to the retirement village?”

    Take that, old man! And bring your Times Square billboards with you!

  9. Seriously with the trailers for Hot Tub and Kick-Ass you give shit to this movie? Come on.

    Edgar Wright gave us Spaced, Shaun of the Dead & Hot Fuzz.

  10. I love both Edgar Wright and the Scott Pilgrim books as much as anyone, but that trailer feels like nails on a chalkboard. Hearing the dialogue out loud just ain’t working for me at all, all the special effect-y stuff seems really forced and worst of all, I agree that Cera just plain seems like a bad fit as Scott. Holy hell I love the shit out of comics but I wish they’d just stop making movies out of the fucking things already.

  11. REALLY looking forward to this.

    That said, Devin… it really fascinates me that you of all people have been so consistently high on “Scott Pilgrim,” given that it’s basically a smarter-than-it-needs-to-be romanticization of the young white male geek culture you spend so much time railing against. It’d be like spotting Tim Robbins lugging around a first edition of The Fountainhead.

    Speaking of which, I realize this is talking to a brick wall, but… Jeff? Gives this a chance. Yes, fine, the gamer/comic/geek references are most-likely outside your time or realm-of-respect, but get below the surface and I think you’ll “recognize” Scott and his world – i.e. creative/sensitive youth pushing against mundanity, bleeding-edge fantasy life and worship of difficult, impossible lady muses. Think of it this way: If this had been made 30-40 years ago, Scott would be a beat poet or a jazz musician instead of an indie/emo(?)-rocker, and his world would be half-in/half-out of Modernist paintings and Fellini movies instead of Nintendo games and Manga. Same song, new instruments.

  12. If Edgar Wright hadn’t been directing this, I’d say “Hell no!” based on that trailer. Literally the only thing I responded to was that last scene between Cera and Anna Kendrick.

  13. What does it actually take to like this thing? It seems that every movie website is busting a gut about the “awesomeness” of the trailer. Do you need to be in love with the books to like this? I didn’t see anything here that we haven’t seen a million times already. Even the “Ka-Pow” shit has been done before.

  14. “Think of it this way: If this had been made 30-40 years ago, Scott would be a beat poet or a jazz musician instead of an indie/emo(?)-rocker, and his world would be half-in/half-out of Modernist paintings and Fellini movies instead of Nintendo games and Manga. Same song, new instruments.”

    And it still look like a torturous piece of shit.

  15. Great source material but I’m so cold on Cera. There must be some other more convincing doof-loser to cast. I’ll take any member of The Inbetweeners.

  16. “Think of it this way: If this had been made 30-40 years ago, Scott would be a beat poet or a jazz musician instead of an indie/emo(?)-rocker, and his world would be half-in/half-out of Modernist paintings and Fellini movies instead of Nintendo games and Manga. Same song, new instruments.”

    God, I’m so glad they didn’t make this 30-40 years ago.

  17. I’ll hit it. Looks more amusing than Kick-Ass and less wanky than 500 Days of Summer. Though I will admit that casting Cera in it makes it resemble a Nick and Norah sequel more than an adaptation of the source material. Furthermore, considering his niche appeal, it really makes me wonder why anyone would fund an Arrested Development movie spin-off which isn’t DTV.

    bmc: I’m old, too, but I can still dig Wright.

    Adam: It’ll make money from the fans, but it’ll probably bomb with everyone else. Could end up being a cult hit on home video, though.

    Colin: It’s the Cera factor.

  18. lol@DZ being onboard for this P.O.S.

    I was sort of undecided on this, but that just pushed me firmly into “skip it” land.

  19. Kane: Yeah, I know. You’ll just be watching that big-budget Hercules: The Legendary Journeys movie instead. I get it.

  20. Wells to Devin Faraci: You’re playing the age-ism card again? You seem to be saying that only grumpy older fellows like myself can’t stand one more movie that relies on Cera’s low-key/deadpan/ironic/too-cool-for-school manner? Are you KIDDING?

    People of all ages, races and creeds are leaning over and vomiting on the sidewalk over the idea of sitting through another Michael Cera Chinese water-torture personality movie. After Youth in Revolt the idea of watching another one is HORRIFIC! And you think this view/conviction is spurred by some fucking age issue?

    In September 2008 I wrote the following:

    “13 months ago Michael Cera, the 19 year-old costar of the just-opened Superbad, was suddenly the Guy of the Moment — a cool new GenY talent who embodied a very dry, droll and witty comic mentality, which was also evident in Clark and Michael, his co-created web series.

    “And yet today — don’t laugh — I’m getting a feeling that Cera may be two or three steps from being over.

    “I’m not saying this is in the cards, and I’m not saying I don’t enjoy Cera’s comic sensibility — I do. But if he is in fact on the brink of being over (which is to say completely done within two or three years), the two main reasons are (a) he’s already repeating himself and (b) his aversion to being famous, hard to swallow from a guy who’s been acting since he was 10 or 11 years old, is profoundly tiresome. Nobody has time for that sensitive “poor me because I’m rich and famous” shit. I don’t, I can tell you.

    “Three months after Superbad opened — early September, or a little more than a year ago — Juno played the Telluride Film Festival and there was Cera again, playing more or less the same Superbad character but without Jonah Hill to play off and minus the great rapier-wit lines.

    “And then his latest film, Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist (Sony, 10.3), played the Toronto Film Festival, and again people — okay, a big-city critic-journalist I spoke with just before travelling to Toronto — said Cera is more or less playing the Superbad guy again and that he needs to expand his repertoire.

    “When I passed this observation along to some journalists friends at the beginning of the festival, one of them joked about Cera,’That settles it — we need to take this guy down.’

    “I’m not trying to take Cera or anyone else down, but I am saying — observing — that the window of coolness and hotness seems to be getting shorter and shorter these days, and that Cera may soon find himself a victim of this syndrome. If he doesn’t pull something new out of his hat, I mean.

    “The fact that one guy has already begun to tire of Cera’s act may sound ludicrous, but it also suggests that perhaps he is playing the same tune over and over.”

    http://www.hollywood-elsewhere.com/2008/09/on_the_brink.php

    Barring some casting miracle or visitation from Jesus the Son of God, Cera is effectively finished right now. The only wrinkle is that some people (like yourself) don’t seem to realize this. He may continue to work in some capacity, but his over-ness will be a settled issue by next year, as I predicted in that article. And absolutely dead-fucking-over by 2012…unless, you know, he makes a movie that really works. A Superbad, a Juno…anything in which he doesn’t make audiences beg for mercy with his fucking dry-as-a-bone, deadpan, flippant, cool, super-reserved, empty-expression nerd personality.

  21. Cera is really stretching his acting chops in this one. You can tell because he is wearing a real jacket and not a track hoodie.

  22. If Devin ‘Terminator Salvation’ Faraci and DZ are championing your film it’s time to start worrying.

    And I like Edgar Wright, but looks like this will be the one he’ll come unstuck on.

    I’ll side with Kris Tapley, enough of the comic-book movies already, especially since 90% of them are total crap.

  23. I’m 34 and I guess I just failed the litmus test. Neither this nor Kick-Ass hold any appeal for me. Anyhoo, The Expendables is out the same weekend, now that’s an event.

  24. mark: Yeah, because Avatar is so much more fucking deep and inspired than what Faraci likes.

    Anyway, I’ll admit I’m getting “The Wizard” vibes from this thing. But to pull a Lex, I’m on Team Winstead. She seems to have decent prospects, since she doesn’t come off dumb like Fox, or flighty like Zooey, and isn’t willing to settle for coming-of- age movies like K-Stew. Of course, Winstead could always fritter away her promising career, Rachel Leigh Cook-style, but she seems more willing to expand her range than the other actresses I’ve seen, who’d prefer to make money before their “sell-by” dates.

  25. Also, that article’s a tad misleading, as movie trends tend to make a come-back, and do not in fact stay inert forever once they go out of style. [For example, see 3D.] As for why Superman 1 and 2 didn’t spawn more comic book movies, I imagine it’s because they came out during the post-Star Wars boom, so they were considered anomalies. And there were in fact plenty of movies based on comic book films during the Burton Batman years, but many of them didn’t take.

  26. Come on, this is Edgar Wright MINUS Simon Pegg PLUS doing his first U.S. film. So divide his talent by his missing more talented collaborator and factor in the curse of most foreign (even English speaking) directors gone Hollywood and then add Cera. Blend, chug and barf.

  27. Technically, he said it was a U.S. film and that’s right. Stop correcting people on shit they didn’t even write, it’s annoying as fuck.

    Also, stop referencing Lex in every other post. That’s creepy.

    Point taken about Cera, Jeff, but isn’t it fair to say that in this day and age any performer is only two or three steps away from being “over?”

  28. If Devin ‘Terminator Salvation’ Faraci and DZ are championing your film it’s time to start worrying.

    And I like Edgar Wright, but looks like this will be the one he’ll come unstuck on.

    I’ll side with Kris Tapley, enough of the comic-book movies already, especially since 90% of them are total crap.

  29. At this point, it’s doubtful that “comic book movies” are going to go away completely – it’s proved too rich a source of material and too many people pitching what would’ve been spec scripts a decade ago are doing them as comics and then selling the rights. “Based on the graphic novel…” is probably here to stay, and will look positively quaint once “based on the classic video game” becomes the next “geek thing we take seriously now” in about five years.

    It’s much more likely that SUPERHERO MOVIES – based on comics or not – will level off at some point. But that doesn’t really cover material like “Pilgrim,” which (seems to be) more off on it’s own kick of “teen romance as filtered through the minds of nerdly teen males” (i.e. Scott has to LITERALLY “win” the girl by LITERALLY “defeating” his romantic rivals… in-succession, video game style, with magical scifi weaponry.)

    But even then… I dunno. Granted, I’m biased: I’d be ECSTATIC for a world where superhero movies never stopped coming out – even if it meant scrapping the barrel and dealing with mega-hyped “Detective Chimp” or “Typeface” movies. But right now Superheroes seem to be filling the niche of “broad genre in which to stick a macho morality-play” that Westerns filled nearly-forever and Arnold/Sly/etc filled in the 80s and 90s.

    As in… from about the dawn of American film to about 75-79, if a writer was setting out based on “I want to tell a story about THIS kind of protagonist against THIS kind of antagonist,” most of the time you’d probably end up doing it as a Western because it was a language everyone knew (cowboys, bandits, indians, shoot-outs, “draw!,” cathouses, etc) but almost know one knew firsthand. In that respect, superhero stories are the PERFECT vehicle for a modern Hollywood largely afraid – mostly for economic reasons – of seeming to make a “stand” on anything. For one example, I think it could be argued that by subbing a superhero and supervillian(s) for the America/Al-Qaeda/Military-Industrial-Complex trifecta, “Iron Man” gets the “terrorists bad, amoral western war-profiteers worse” angle across a lot better than, say, “Green Zone” does.

  30. Jeff…

    Regardless of your feelings about this trailer, or premise, or sight of Cera once again being Cera, Scott Pilgrim will be popular (and I imagine you will do a half about-face in three months time, claiming that it works better than you thought it would), and therefore, your theory that everyone has started to despise Cera’s schtick will no longer hold water. As someone who doesn’t care much either way – nothing Cera has done, save Arrested Development, has seemed that great to me – I can only say that, in terms of your prophetic judgment, this film will find an audience – and Cera’s career will be revived for another year or so.

  31. I’m in my mid-30s, LOVED Kick-Ass (it is going to make a ton of money, no doubt), but this doesn’t do anything for me. I’m a huge fan of Shaun of the Dead and Hot Fuzz, but I’m going to hold off on seeing this.

  32. Eh, I’ll give it a look for Edgar Wright, but…

    I never “got” Scott Pilgrim.

    Yeah, up yours too.

    Nope. Thought it too slight and it seemed to be working a little too hard to say, “Look at me! I’m made for you!”

    It’s a young adult novel masquerading as an indie graphic novel. And not a ‘shot-in-the-dark’ kind of effort (like JK Rowling), but one of those pre-sold properties where they already have movie rights and a website lined up before the thing has been published.

    As I said- I’ll give the movie a look, but interest is… falling…

  33. I’ve never read a Scott Pilgrim book, although a friend has said that maybe I’ll get the trailer better if I did.

    I was on board with Kick-Ass, without having read the first collection it’s based on. I finally read the graphic novel the other night, and basically thought: I know it’s going to be comic book referential, but if the movie is this nerdy, it’s going to die quickly – and I say that as a strong supporter of Matthew Vaughn. I was one of the 3 people that saw Stardust in the theater. Loved every second of it. Introduced my girlfriend to the movie and she loved it too more than she was expecting…so I’ve got faith that Vaughn can do Kick-Ass without alienating everyone else.

    As for Edgar Wright…well, Shaun of the Dead is classic. Hot Fuzz was somewhere between okay and good…and this looks…I guess it doesn’t look bad. It just looks very esoteric. I may pick up some of the books and give ‘em a read. Maybe I’ll be converted. I’ve watched the trailer a few times and the only thing I’m sold on is that Chris Evans is maybe the only actor in it that “gets” it.

  34. Edgar Wright is JJ Abrams with film-making skills. Spaced, Shaun and Hot Fuzz were all great fun and well made. No reason to suspect this will be any different.

  35. I tried to watch Spaced. I just didn’t find it all that funny or interesting.

    That being said, I think Edgar Wright’s film work to date has been pretty damn good. But I worry that, without Simon Pegg as writer and star, this might end up being a lesser effort, not unlike Wes Anderson’s output without Owen Wilson as writer and star.

    (And before any of you start yapping about Wilson being in Zissou and Darjeeling and Mr. Fox, he didn’t co-write them with Anderson. I’m starting to think Wilson the writer was what kept Anderson the filmmaker grounded.)

  36. Wait, the girlfriend is MARY ELIZABETH WINSTEAD????

    Seriously, what BurmaShave said… What did she do to herself???? Did she get a full facial transplant??? I liked her in FD3, Ring Two, Black Christmas, etc… and wouldn’t have picked her out of a POLICE LINEUP. It’s not just the colored hair… she’s morphed into an entirely different human being.

    Cera is so douchey it’s almost a shortcut to thinking to qualify him as such, but really there’s no other word: Pure, uncut, mainlined DOUCHE. One-note, boring, tiresome and probably smells like the backroom of Jetrag.

    BUT Chris Evans seems like the one and only reason to see this. That guy is the real thing, like you think he’s just some anonymous, bland cipher, then halfway through any Evans movie you realize, HEY, this guy’s kind of awesome actually. He’s almost like a 21st century CHARLIE SHEEN, where at first glance you’d have thought, eh, it’s some bland good-looking jerk who everything goes right for… Then you realize he’s all weird and charismatic and has this strange undercurrent and edge. GOOD ACTOR.

    Edgar Wright? Nothing against him, sort of amused by both his two “big” movies, but not THAT amused. Both SHAUN and FUZZ are precisely the kinds of things that Internet film geeks WAY OVERPRAISE, both because they flatter a nerd with their references and reverence for formative genre fair, AND because they’re BRITISH, which makes the average CHUD/AICN geek think he’s seeing something cooler than it is. Plus you rope in all the idiots who are into MONTY PYTHON, which is a whole other sphere of DORK.

    Wright’s compositions are generally… eh, okay, but a little too POWDER BLUE and anemic; His KITCHEN SINK APPROACH also works against his movies; Shaun is fairly tight, but what’s with HOT FUZZ making time for some caped elders conspiracy straight out of Eyes Wide Shut or Ninth Gate? Indulgent. And Pegg RIDING IN ON A HORSE is so BRITISH, UNFUNNY, EMBARRASSING, and NOTHING LIKE ANYTHING that would EVER be in the movies it’s parodying… again, BRITISH, just can’t shake that vague Monty Python/Mr. Bean vibe that is so painful and deadly and dorky.

    If Edgar Wright weren’t British, he’d be Shawn Levy or at the very best a “comedic” Len Wiseman. Not that much style or energy… it was PEGG (and I guess Frost, but mostly Pegg) who gave those movies their zing.

  37. I’ve never read a Scott Pilgrim book, although a friend has said that maybe I’ll get the trailer better if I did.
    I was on board with Kick-Ass, without having read the first collection it’s based on. I finally read the graphic novel the other night, and basically thought: I know it’s going to be comic book referential, but if the movie is this nerdy, it’s going to die quickly – and I say that as a strong supporter of Matthew Vaughn. I was one of the 3 people that saw Stardust in the theater. Loved every second of it. Introduced my girlfriend to the movie and she loved it too more than she was expecting…so I’ve got faith that Vaughn can do Kick-Ass without alienating everyone else.
    As for Edgar Wright…well, Shaun of the Dead is classic. Hot Fuzz was somewhere between okay and good…and this looks…I guess it doesn’t look bad. It just looks very esoteric. I may pick up some of the books and give ‘em a read. Maybe I’ll be converted. I’ve watched the trailer a few times and the only thing I’m sold on is that Chris Evans is maybe the only actor in it that “gets” it.

  38. Lex: Can’t agree with the Wiseman/Levy comparison. Wiseman’s a fairly generic action hack, like a younger Rob Cohen (although I quite enjoyed Die Hard 4), and Levy is one of those anonymous “family comedy” guys with no discernible style. Wright has a very distinctive “look” with his big bag of camera tricks. In fact, the closest comparison I can think of is Guy Ritchie in Snatch-mode; all rapidly edited close-ups on normally mundane actions (like opening a door handle) to show the passage of time.

    I love Spaced, but I’m always fairly amazed that the American geek community has embraced it so much, given that at least 50% of the jokes are about obscure British things that I can’t imagine Americans having any concept of. There’s no real American equivalent. Perhaps Seinfeld, which doesn’t translate abroad at all. But when there are jokes about Grange Hill and Jaffa Cakes, I’m always skeptical that the American geeks really find it THAT funny when surely these things are flying directly over their head.

    As for comic book movies: I agree that they’re here to stay, but not necessarily as superheroes alone. Road to Perdition and Ghost World were technically comic book movies, so there’s plenty of scope there. Hollywood finds them attractive because they’re basically storyboarded already for them. I don’t think anyone in the real world will have any clue that Scott Pilgrim is a comic book movie, and they certainly won’t class it in the same category as Spider-Man or the Green Lantern or anything.

    If anything’s going to kill comic book movies, it’ll be The Avengers, which promises to be an utter shit show of excess and stupidity. Jon Favreau has already distanced himself from it because he knows that Iron Man, as established by him and Downey, etc. is simply not going to work when teamed with a NORSE GOD, a GIANT GREEN BEAST, and a TIME-TRAVELLING SUPER-SOLDIER from World War II. It’s absurd. Like suddenly introducing Killer Croc into Nolan’s Batman universe, it just won’t work.

    Audiences can’t handle crossovers the same way that comic fans can. And in purely narrative terms, having 5-6 lead characters isn’t going to fly. Even in the X-Men movies each character only got limited screentime, and they hadn’t already had their own stand-alone films.

  39. Eloi, people in the US don’t like SPACED because they enjoy pretending to laugh at impossible-to get British references, they love it for its characters, its inventiveness and its general excellence as comedy. It was a great show, SHAUN was brilliant, and Edgar Wright is awesome. Comics that work on the page don’t always work in motion, and with PILGRIM, tone and style is *everything*. The movie feels like an entirely different, Cera-laden thing, only with the same plot overlaid on it. I loved him in ARRESTED DEVELOPMENT, I’m not a hater – it’s just that hearing his voice say Scott’s lines is like some weird nightmare transposition. I don’t see the point, but that’s obviously complicated by the fact I don’t believe the comic can be improved in the transition to film. So basically it’s all my own damn fault.

  40. As for Shaun of the Dead, I’ve said for ages that it should be mandatory viewing in film school because of how tight the script is. Every little plot strand or throwaway line is resolved or revisited later on. It’s a great film.

  41. Eloi – Interesting theory about Spaced popularity among nerds, but I think most geeks, being true obsessive geeks, would look up the Brit references they don’t get then try to pass it off like they knew it the whole time. (That’s what I did, anyway).

    Completely agree about Shaun being taught as a perfect screenplay but I think Hot Fuzz is even tighter as a script.

    Lex – Comparing Wright to Wiseman is just mean, dude.

    DZ- I’m with you on Team WInstead, but after her two brief moments in this, Team Kendrick might take over.

  42. Eloi: thanks for the link to the music video. I still think Pilgrim needs a complete, and more engaging, trailer, but Wright’s design and flashing play with panel layouts siding about the visual field with the four-minute song gives me a lot more hope than I had before.

  43. Jesus Christ this looks terrible. And I’m a big fan of EW.

    Why am I not surprised that this is the movie DZ wants to see?

  44. China: The movie I want to see is Expendables. But I’m willing to give Pilgrim a whirl because it looks like an amusing diversion.

  45. I was very very wary about this film all about my revulsion to Michael Cera’s usual mumbling acting method. No I’m definitely NOT checking this thing out despite Edgar Wright’s involvement. Can’t wait for him to reteam with Pegg & Frost!

  46. Eloi:

    “Jon Favreau has already distanced himself from it because he knows that Iron Man, as established by him and Downey, etc. is simply not going to work when teamed with a NORSE GOD, a GIANT GREEN BEAST, and a TIME-TRAVELLING SUPER-SOLDIER from World War II. It’s absurd.”

    Technically, Captain America isn’t a “time-traveler,” he just looks really, really good for an 80 year old…

    In any case, given that Favreau went into production on Iron Man originally planning for his principle villain to The Mandarin – a several thousand year-old Chinese sorceror who stole magic powers from space-aliens – only to opt to “save him for the sequels” and still allude to him, I doubt he’s opting out for reasons of integrity.

    At the end of the day, no matter how many grownups (geek or otherwise) get into them, superhero movies are primarily for kids; so so long as The Avengers “make sense” to a 10 year-old it makes all the sense it probably needs to. If audiences in 1981 accepted that the otherwise-”realistic” (at least as much as Iron Man was) Raiders of the Lost Ark ending with a literal power-of-God supernatural light-show, I imagine audiences in fantasy-saturated 2010 will accept a god, a monster and whatever craziness shows up to be the bad guy teaming up with nominally-human Cap and Iron Man.

  47. RE: The MovieBob

    Maybe it’s because a whole hell of a lot of American audiences didn’t see the magic Deus Ex Machina in Raiders as “magic” at all. Plenty of people would consider the Jealous, Angry YHWH to be perfectly “realistic”.

    I’m not one of them, but I’m just sayin’

  48. MovieBob & hunterd: literally a Deus Ex Machina, the Arc was the McGuffin that motivated everyone, not the hero or the villain in and of itself. (Or should I write Itself with a capital?) There have been a ton of team books done over the decades with JLA as well as Avengers, etc., and almost always the best stories come out of antagonists that can clearly challenge the most powerful members of the group individually, overlooking the heroic tenacity of the “weaker” members and their lesser abilities. It’s been done in the comics, ad infinitum; someone does has a chance to find a way even in the greater reality demands of film. But yeah, way tough to do without a doubt.

  49. I get that doing a “team-up” movie like Avengers is tough, but I think it’s achievable. I’ve just always wanted to see someone at least TRY.

    The notion of this – or something LIKE this – essentially dynamiting the walls between genres THRILLS me. “Iron Man” is basically a Tom Clancy bit with more-futuristic technology… but as of the end of the “Hulk” movie, Iron Man now officially “lives” in the same world as guys who get radiation-zapped and morph into Shrek. In a year’s time, BOTH of those guys will be “living” in the same world as the literal Norse Gods. Think of the possibilities that opens up, back and forth: Iron Man could fight a fucking DRAGON in the third one; why not? Is a dragon not as “realistic” as Iron Man’s drinkin’ buddy, the Viking God of Thunder?

    “Reality” is a crutch for people with weak imaginations. Fuck reality, and more-specifically fuck “realism” in cinema. Let this be the hammer that smashes all the arbitrary walls down: Give me Jason Bourne time-traveling back to Camelot. Show me James Bond versus zombies. Put the next “Fast & Furious” thing in space. Rambo vs. Dinosaurs. Why the fuck not?

  50. “Reality” is a crutch for people with weak imaginations. Fuck reality, and more-specifically fuck “realism” in cinema. Let this be the hammer that smashes all the arbitrary walls down: Give me Jason Bourne time-traveling back to Camelot. Show me James Bond versus zombies. Put the next “Fast & Furious” thing in space. Rambo vs. Dinosaurs. Why the fuck not?

    1) A Connecticut Gun-totter in King Arthur’s Court. Check.

    2) To Die and Let Live. Check.

    3) Fast and Mercurious: to Perihelion and Back. Check.

    4) Rambo 6, Dinosaurs 0. Weak.

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