Baldwin, Toback, Lyndon

I took two Olympus digital recorders to yesterday’s Barry Lyndon discussion with Alec Baldwin and James Toback. I pushed the record button on the newer one and placed it on the stage just before the session began, and somehow it recorded nothing. I successfully recorded their discussion with an older device from my seat, but after a while I wondered what the point was of having two recordings so I turned it off.


Director-writer James Toback (l.), actor Alec Baldin during yesterday afternoon’s hour-long chat at Savannah’s Lucas theatre.

Baldwin was funny and brilliant and so was Toback, and there I was in the fourth row, technically blowing it all to hell. Here‘s the short miserable clip that I recorded with the older device. Oh, and I accidentally deleted my photos so I had to borrow these shots from another site.

Toback told a funny story that happened during the cutting of Spartacus, which Kubrick directed and Kirk Douglas produced and starred in. The story came from editor Robert Lawrence, who later edited Toback’s Fingers and Exposed.

Kubrick and Lawrence were editing the finale when Jean Simmons, escaping from Rome with the help of Peter Ustinov , is saying goodbye to Douglas, who’s dying on a cross. Kubrick told Lawrence he didn’t want to use what he felt was a grotesque close-up of Douglas. Lawrence said the shot wasn’t so bad and in any case Douglas will surely complain when he notices that his closeup is missing. “I don’t care what he says,” Kubrick said. “I’m the director…take it out.” They later showed the scene to Douglas, and his immediate comment was exactly what Lawrence had predicted — “Where’s my closeup?” Kubrick shrugged and said, “I don’t know, Kirk.” He then turned to Lawrence and said, “Where’s his close-up?”

9 thoughts on “Baldwin, Toback, Lyndon

  1. Wells to Milkman: What would you need to hear to call a person “well qualified” to talk intelligently about Stsnley Kubrick? Are you qualified? Am I? Wouldn’t the basic qualifier be that a person has to have seen every Kubrick film numerous times? Toback knows what he’s talking about as much as anyone else when it comes to Stsnley K.

  2. “What would you need to hear to call a person “well qualified” to talk intelligently about Stsnley Kubrick? Are you qualified? Am I? Wouldn’t the basic qualifier be that a person has to have seen every Kubrick film numerous times? Toback knows what he’s talking about as much as anyone else when it comes to Stsnley K.”

    If thats the criteria, you have NO IDEA how much I hope that Michael Bay owns all of Kubrick’s movies.

  3. Next: Abel Ferrara and Alan Alda discuss the films of John Ford.

    Next: Edward Burns and Kelsey Grammer discuss the films of Kenneth Anger.

    Next: Henry Jaglom and Tim Allen discuss the films of Luis Bunuel.

    Next: Bob Rafelson and Jimmy Smits discuss the films of David Cronenberg.

    Next: Mike Leigh and Ed O’Neil discuss the films of John Carpenter.

    Next: Paul Mazursky and Danny Aiello discuss the films of Andrei Tarkovsky.

    Next: Kevin Smith and Scott Bakula discuss the films of Satyajit Ray.

  4. Jeff, I’m not trying to jab you for your tech fumbles, but I’ve never met or read about anyone with such a littered history of tech travesties. The lost phones, dropped cameras, crashed hard drives, malfunctioning laptops, deleted photos, on-off switch confusion, etc, etc, etc.

    You should be proud in a way. It’s almost as if your subconscious is carrying out repeated acts of self-sabotage as a form of protest against the inevitable embrace of the digital age. You can take pride in that, I guess.

    Do your boys laugh or shudder each time they hear about your latest tech blunder? A bit of both, I hope.

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