Enormous Hair Changes

When a lead character in a big-studio franchise has a longer hair style in the second film it’s because the actor happened to grow his hair and didn’t feel like making it short again, and because the director and the producers didn’t give a shit either about hair continuity. Hence Sam Worthington‘s “Danny McBride perm” in Wrath of the Titans.

Eff the audience if they don’t like my longer hair. I wore it short for Clash of the Titans because my Avatar character had short hair and it hadn’t grown out. Or because I was in a short-hair groove at the time. Or whatever. Deal with it.

Tom Cruise‘s Ethan Hunt has a Marine-style buzz cut in the first Mission: Impossible, and then he returned in the sequel (the Notorious-style one with Thandie Newton) with longish rock-star hair. It didn’t matter. Nobody cared.

Mark Hamill‘s Luke Skywalker had longish mid ’70s hair when he made Star Wars. When he returned for The Empire Strikes Back three years later his hair was slightly shorter. Why? Because men’s hair stylings in ’79 or ’80 were slightly shorter — no other reason. Hamill had a still shorter, vaguely combed-down executive cut in 1983′s Return of the Jedi.


Mcworthingbride (thanks to HE reader Dennis Pagoulatos — a.k.a. “Padre la Tiempo”)

20 thoughts on “Enormous Hair Changes

  1. I fail to see how a character’s change in appearance in sequels suggests anti-continuity. If anything, it shows the evolution of the character as well as a progressed time in the narrative, even if it is a shitty trilogy.

  2. The action of “Wrath” is a decade after the end of “Clash,” as Perseus has a son — and lost his wife (Gemma Arterton). So the change of Perseus’ hair is no big deal. Besides, the hair is the least of that movie’s problems.

  3. Yeah, I don’t think continuity comes into it in some franchises. They use hair changes specifically to show the passage of time. Look at the way Bruce Wayne’s hair and beard changes in every flashback/forward in Batman Begins, to differentiate which part of the story we’re in. Or in the Star Wars prequels, where the changing hair/facial hair shows Obi-Wan and Anakin’s ageing.

  4. Dude has a HUUUUUUUUGE noggin. Has its own weather system. Wonder if he has trouble haulin’ that gargantuan cranium around.

  5. While I’m no fan of the TITANS movies, it should be pointed out that 10 years have passed when the second one starts — long enough for Perseus to grow his hair out or do any damn thing with it he pleases. So your commentary makes no sense here.

  6. You know you’re just torturing LexG by starting a thread about Sam Worthington and hair, and not allowing him to join in.

  7. I agree with Barnes. If years have passed in the continuity, as is often the case, it actually helps to act as a quick visual reference for the character’s development over that time.

    This may come as news to you Jeff but people, particularly younger people, do change their hairstyles on occasion, and not just for the sake of style…sometimes they do it for a change, or to announce some kind of personal evolution. Why would it be different in fiction?

  8. Dude wanted to look older and more mature with longer hair. This hardly seems like a shitfit or laziness, from what I remember about the first film, isn’t Worthington involved in this franchise creatively in some way too?

  9. The real problem is how monumentally less attractive he is with that ugly blow out hair. He’s a blunt instrument he should be styled as one at all times.

  10. My point is that the kind of hair an actor has when filming begins on the second or third installment of a crap-level franchise has nothing to do with anything other than the fact that the actor felt like wearing his hair this way…period. Forget the passage of time. Worthington just had longer hair…period.

  11. Glad you like it, Jeff!

    The biggest question that no one has asked is: didn’t anybody have the stones to tell Worthington that the giant Brillo hair doesn’t look good on him. Passage of time? Fine, give the guy some facial hair, not Jermaine Jackson’s ‘do.

  12. Yeah but what about the receding hairline in the first picture. I know he’s a demi-god or something or maybe there’s a hairclub for men franchise on Mt Olympus

  13. Wouldn’t necessarily call that receding. People do have angular hairlines like that.

    I’m just glad I have Wells to sort this out. I will go into the movie tomorrow so much better educated.

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