Room At The Inn

Non-adventurous, cautious-minded ComicCon journos were fretting today about missing today’s noon deadline for the ComicCon hotels form. “Convinced it’s too late, will sleep on the street,” one said. It’s always preferable to plan ahead and feel secure, of course, but people with gumption can always improvise and make do.

The last time I attended ComicCon I just drove around and found the most attractive (or at least tolerable) down-at-the-heels flophouses in the northern regions. Pacific Beach, Ocean Beach…that line of country. Fleabag motels are always cheaper and almost never filled to capacity. Because the vast majority of cautious-minded travelers refuse to stay in them.

The only way I’ll ever attend ComicCon again is if a major, must-see film has its first-ever showing there. Otherwise forget it. ComicCon is Ground Zero for the CGI jizz, comic-book jail cell, moronic videogame flip-flop mentality that has all but ruined action films, and has made fantasy films as predictable as fast-food menus at Wendy’s. Almost everything I hate about movies today seems to have originated there. The less Hollywood caters to the ComicCon mentality, the better off movies in general will be.

The esteemed James Rocchi, Drew McWeeny, Katey Rich and Ed Douglas are ComicCon swoonies and more power to them, but I am God’s Lonely Man. I see the ComicCon crowd the way Travis Bickle regarded the “whores, skunk pussies, buggers, queens, fairies, junkies…sick, venal.”

What keeps me going, of course, are the exceptions to the rule, which always pop through, thank fortune.

Laziness and cowardice are the primary causes of bad, spirit-deflating movies. The ComicCon factor isn’t entirely to blame.

  • Blore

    Please come and stay nearby I want to steal your fuckass camera from you when you are talking smack to some other critic- again!

  • Katey

    For most of us who cover Comic Con, it means 16-hour workdays and then parties and four hours of sleep. A hotel close to the convention center makes a huge difference in your quality of life for those 5 days. A fleabag hotel by the ocean sounds great, but that’s not what covering Comic Con is about for the bulk of press there. It might be non-adventurous, but it’s the only responsible way to do it.

  • Jeffrey Wells

    Wells to Blore: Thanks for chiming in and offering a robust representation of the moronic mentality that ComicCon sometimes attracts. Flip-flops, squiggly beards, Jabba bellies and T-shirts forever!

  • Jeffrey Wells

    I agree with Katey. You can’t fool around when you have all that work to do. But if you have wheels and can’t find a decent place nearby, a flophouse wil suffice.

  • Zach

    The root of the problem isn’t the comic-culture. It’s the men behind the curtain. If the shot-callers strove for more than just a decent bottom line, and really put their hearts and souls into adapting the source material instead of half-assedly buying up properties for their assembly line, this would be a non-issue. Unfortunately, they understand all too well the fact that most moviegoers are mouth breathing morons who wouldn’t know a good film if it bit them in the ass. From a business perspective, you can’t really blame them. From every other perspective, it’s lazy, irresponsible, and detrimental.

    Still, you should go. The posts/comments here would be priceless.

  • T. J. Kong

    “I am God’s Lonely Man. I see the ComicCon crowd the way Travis Bickle regarded the ‘whores, skunk pussies, buggers, queens, fairies, junkies…sick, venal.'”

    I will pay to see this movie.

  • Travis Actiontree

    “ComicCon is Ground Zero for the CGI jizz, comic-book jail cell, moronic videogame flip-flop mentality that has all but ruined action films, and has made fantasy films as predictable as fast-food menus at Wendy’s. Almost everything I hate about movies today seems to have originated there. The less Hollywood caters to the ComicCon mentality, the better off movies in general will be.”

    Bears repeating.

    Truer words have never been spun from the rapidly typing digits of Herr Wells. Nicely put, Jeffrey.

  • James Rocchi

    I’ve been to Comic-Con once. Once. If that makes me ‘Swoony,’ then I don’t know.

    Politely contending your assertion,

    J.

  • Eloi Wrath

    Why do you sign your name on internet message boards, “J.”? Isn’t that what people do on notes to their spouse they leave on the kitchen table?

    “Don’t forget we have dinner with the Andersons tonight! J.”

  • James Rocchi

    No closing salutation would be rude, but a full signature would be redundant.

    J.

  • dkaye

    Not that they need me to defend them, but none of the people you mentioned above are what I would call “swoonies.” Not that we don’t like what Comic-Con can offer, but we’re there because it’s part of our beat and we make a living covering it.

    What Wells fails to realize or include about the alleged Comic-Con mentality infecting Hollywood is that the fans don’t like a lot of the movies being offered up either. Were GREEN LANTERN, SUCKER PUNCH or COWBOYS & ALIENS smashes? I am just as saddened when something like TRANSFORMERS becomes so huge, but that’s just as easy to blame on the masses who will go see PAUL BLART.

    As for the hotel situation, I can only agree with what Katey said above. And forget about driving and parking anywhere.

  • Kakihara

    Supposedly, Nolan’s gonna be there, but I already saw him at the Egyptian, and that event was already busy enough. I do wanna go for Katsuhiro Otomo, but he’s been known to flake out on appearances lately.

  • scooterzz

    just my opinion but, i’ve been to cannes and i’ve been to comic con…

    “whores, skunk pussies, buggers, queens, fairies, junkies…sick, venal.”

    …sounds more like cannes to me

  • sonicyogurt

    “What Wells fails to realize or include about the alleged Comic-Con mentality infecting Hollywood is that the fans don’t like a lot of the movies being offered up either. Were GREEN LANTERN, SUCKER PUNCH or COWBOYS & ALIENS smashes?”

    That, and even some of the movies that are gigantic at Comic Con — take Scott Pilgrim vs. the World, for instance — don’t necessarily meet with any great success in the wild.

    The idea for a while there seemed to be that San Diego was a brilliant marketing opportunity, speaking directly to a wildly enthusiastic, vocal audience that’d serve as tastemakers and help spread the word. I’ve only been to Comic Con once, and when I think of the most pervasive things I saw being promoted there — Battle: Los Angeles, NBC’s The Event, Scott Pilgrim — few of them really made that big of an impact outside the show. The Walking Dead is an obvious exception. Tron: Legacy was everywhere but didn’t do mindblowing numbers at the box office. I don’t know. I got the impression from what people were saying last year that Hollywood’s kind of cluing in that big marketing campaigns at Comic Con didn’t amount to much in the way of ROI. Good word of mouth doesn’t translate to big dollars, and bad word of mouth can be toxic.

  • DrewAtHitFix

    Try again, Jeff.

    I hate Comic-Con. It is the single most stress-filled press event of the year.

    And that’s all it is for me. A press event. A job. I stopped going to Comic-Con years ago, and only started again because it is part of my job at HitFix

    I’m sure, though, that the people who run Comic-Con are huddled together in a room with the organizers of SXSW discussing whether or not they should cancel their events now that Jeff Wells isn’t coming.

  • Aflac Assist LLC

    I had a great time reading this topic. Indeed, this fan convention is worthy to talk about. – Aflac Assist LLC